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27 | Trista Myers, Salesforce Ventures: Dreamforce, Venture Capital, and Bread

  • January 8, 2020
  • 32:29

Trista Myers (Head of Events, Salesforce Ventures) shares a behind the scenes look at Dreamforce, how Salesforce Ventures creates executive experiences, tips for working with multiple event partners, baking recipes, and why you should never sell yourself short when interviewing for your next role.

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Top Takeaways

1

FOCUSING ON THE DETAILS: To bring cohesion to Dreamforce and executive events like the Salesforce Innovation Center, Trista and the team stayed laser-focused on the details.  Synchronization on a variety of minute details like wood and fabric samples helped the team bring to life executive experiences that felt white glove. “We want to make sure that if attendees are going from one executive experience at Dreamforce to another closed-door executive experience, that those experiences feel the same.”

2

BRINGING PARTNERS TOGETHER: Putting together an executive thought leadership event with a partner VC firm required better methods to gain consensus. Trista learned one solution to mitigating conflict when multiple parties manage a single event is bringing in an agency perspective. "They can be that neutral party in between both sides. In this way, the agency can represent both clients and help mediate conflict.”

3

REMEMBERING TO NEVER SELL SHORT: As Trista moved from building events at AOL, to Salesforce, and now Salesforce Ventures, she has one important piece of advice to event organizers: never sell yourself short. During her career, Trista was exposed to all facets of event planning and programming allowing her to navigate any event challenge. “In events you can get all kinds of experience in all kinds of amounts of time. I try to remind myself that the years are not equal to the experience.”

ABOUT Trista Myers

Trista got her start in events at AOL in NYC, where she happily took on challenging projects like AOL’s events at CES, SXSW, Ad Week NYC, and AOL’s Global Volunteer Day. She spent her first few years at Salesforce on the Dreamforce production team, helping execute four Dreamforces. Trista now leads all events for Salesforce Ventures, which amounts to roughly 20-25 events a year globally. In 2018 she was selected for Event Marketer's list of 35 National Experiential Event Professionals under 35 for her work at AOL and on Dreamforce.

Episode Transcript

Brandon:

I understand that you are a baker?

Trista:

Yes, I have been baking since I was in college. As a young girl my mother had a bread maker so that was really easy. She could just throw everything into the machine. But in college whenever I needed to procrastinate, I would start putting something together in the kitchen that then would be something that would be in the oven while I then could go study and then could come back to a finished product.

Brandon:

Fantastic. And did you have any favorite breads that you made?

Trista:

I really love just making like a classic whole wheat bread that then I can eat. But also then for the holidays I make a lot of monkey breads, which is like a New England classic.

Brandon:

What goes into it?

Trista:

Dough and then it's rolled in cinnamon and sugar and then you make a milk and butter brown sugar glaze that goes on that and you take all these little pieces of dough and you put them in a Bundt pan. So that way when you eat it, you look like a monkey. You're pulling it apart. But it's like a very sweet, indulgent dessert that my mom always made around the holidays.

Brandon:

Fantastic. And have you been innovating with any other recipes recently?

Trista:

I found some recipes for bread that you can make in your Dutch oven and it's so really a no need four hour process. I still haven't nailed that 100% but I keep playing around with my Dutch oven because I think it's a really cool tool in the kitchen.

Brandon:

Looking forward to trying some bread later on, but speaking of bread and raising yeast, let's talk about raising funds. With investments in over 300 companies in 20 countries, Salesforce Ventures has achieved some pretty substantial goals in the past years. Speaking of goals, what was a favorite sport when you were younger?

Trista:

My favorite sport was, and still is soccer, still playing currently. I play once a week in an adult coed league, which is great. It's a good outlet for something completely unrelated to my work.

Brandon:

To set the stage for our conversation today. Could you tell us a little bit more about some of the major initiatives at Salesforce Ventures and how they align with your responsibilities as Head of Events?

Trista:

Salesforce Ventures is the investment arm of Salesforce, so we help the company invest in companies that are built on or integrate with Salesforce that help us improve and grow the Salesforce ecosystem. Salesforce Ventures has been investing for about 10 years, but the events program is very young and I'm the first events lead that the team has had. I came onboard about two years ago and had been leading the execution and planning for the program.

Brandon:

I know that you were with Salesforce for many years before you even came onto Salesforce Ventures or SFE Team, but before you even landed at Salesforce, you cut your teeth on events at AOL and in education before then. Could you briefly walk us through each of these steps of your career and how they have led to where you are today?

Trista:

Once I started learning that events is a career path that I could take, I started to get more interested in that. I did a few internships during college that connected me to a lot of the people that helped me find my event planner journey that I'm on today. And someone there from my internship introduced me to the events team at AOL, which is where I started my first job out of college. I joined the AOL Corporate Events Team right out of school and honestly it was probably the best thing for my career. Learning in New York in events is a great place to get onboard with the fast pace, the competitive culture. And then AOL also moves fast and it was a small internal team for all global events. So there was about 12 people that managed and executed events for the whole company and it was a very small lean team that didn't use a lot of agency support, but they tackled pretty much all the events that the company needed.

We did things like board of directors meetings to sales kickoffs of several thousand people, sponsorships at CES, South by Southwest, big volunteer day, small trade shows. So I look back on it as events bootcamp for my career. We were thrown everything, expected to be good at anything. I worked with a really good strong team and without that agency support we all rallied around each other to train each other in events.

Brandon:

During that time at AOL, you said it's bootcamp, you had some exposure to events beforehand that sets you on this path of working professionally in this, but what was one or two takeaways you had during this AOL bootcamp experience?

Trista:

It definitely was a little stressful and at one point our team went from 10 people to six people and we were still expected to produce the work of 10 people. We had one month where we had an event every single day and the team was just stretched thin and pulled apart. I think that's when I started to realize that I needed to take a step back and find some balance in my life and still find an events job and a career that I really loved, but that still would allow for a little bit more personal time. I was happy to do it because of the first few years of my career and I just was going to leave it all in New York on the table, but definitely made me start thinking of what is the next step from here now that I've become a well rounded planner.

Brandon:

You had that experience at AOL and eventually you make the jump to Salesforce, which was not only a leap from company to company but also leap from coast to coast.

Trista:

Yes, it was a big move. I moved across the country by myself, so that was its own challenge. Settled here in San Francisco and then started interviewing and met the people who work on the Dreamforce Team. It was a really big move, but I wanted to get a little closer to emerging technology and wanted to get away from winter.

Brandon:

Well, it's pretty successful. It's a little rainy over here right now as we record this at the beginning of December, but it's not nearly as snowy as it is in New York City.

Trista:

Absolutely. A lot of people when they go to talk to the Dreamforce Team, it's a little scary because these folks have experience in one of the world's biggest software conferences ever, but my experience at AOL made me a well rounded candidate. So when you break down Dreamforce really it is a trade show component, a room block component, transportation. When you boil it down, if you have experience in all of those pieces, you just scale up to find a way to do it for 200,000 people.

Brandon:

Easy. And is that how you pitched it during your interview?

Trista:

Yeah, totally.

Brandon:

That's something interesting that we haven't really talked about on other episodes of the show yet. Taking that experience gathered at one spot and finding a way to leverage it in the interview process into some way, shape or form. Obviously I don't want to reveal the secrets behind the Salesforce interview process, but are there any surprises you found in the process or things you found to be helpful just in general when you're taking that experience and capitalizing on it in the next interview?

Trista:

I think really being able to get down to what you as an individual contribute to a project can be hard to do in an event's interview, but I think that's really valuable. It's easy to say, I was on the Dreamforce Team and I led Dreamforce, but really that breaks down into a couple buckets of responsibilities that are broken across the team and I think when you interview events people it's easy to take credit for the whole program, but often we really want to get into the weeds with what was your contribution, what was your creative vision? I think those are important things to bring forward in your interview.

Brandon:

So that specificity?

Trista:

Yeah.

Brandon:

You spent some time on the Dreamforce Team, what did your responsibilities entail during that time?

Trista:

I helped lead and produce four Dreamforces and really the team has a good way of breaking up the program into a bunch of different responsibilities. There's an unspoken rule often that you work on an area for two years in a row so you can get that perfection. There are some exceptions, some parts of the program people work on year to year.

Brandon:

When you say area, what is that?

Trista:

That could be working on the backpack, for example. The Dreamforce backpack is an iconic swag item that is coveted by all guests and that backpack is made from scratch by the Dreamforce Team. We start out with a bunch of fabrics and colors and really go from there. So for a couple of years I worked on the backpack. I worked on staff uniforms, take a swing at transportation, sponsorships I worked on for a few years. So the buckets are really big. They're really big pieces of the program, but when the six of us come together then, when the puzzle comes together, you get the full conference.

Brandon:

You were specifically working on the swag and the fabrics.

Trista:

Yeah, exactly. Swag or transportation or food or something like that.

Brandon:

Were there other areas that you experienced or explored?

Trista:

Dreamforce is made up of so many pieces. I also worked on the EBC and that was one thing which is now called the SIC, the Salesforce Innovation Center at HQ. That's where we host a lot of our executive level meetings. At Dreamforce we build out a really big executive innovation center. That was one piece of the program that I worked on all four years because it was a really big program that was changing year over year. It was one thing that once you really got into the weeds on and you knew all the details, you were a really valuable planner for that team. And so we didn't separate ways over those four years. Whereas the backpack, I worked on for two years and then it was time to get a succession plan in place to have someone take over and learn that process.

Brandon:

The executive briefing center for Salesforce, what's the acronym for it again?

Trista:

It's now called the SIC, which is the Salesforce Innovation Center. The years that I worked on it, it was still called the EBC, which is the Executive Briefing Center.

Brandon:

This is really active during Dreamforce or throughout the year?

Trista:

We have them at all the headquarters. There's executive briefing centers or SICS, and then at Dreamforce we set one that's dedicated for Dreamforce meetings.

Brandon:

What was that experience like? You had put together a lot of specific events beforehand at different companies and you helped put together Dreamforce, but an executive briefing center. It's a closed environment. It's a closed space. It can change from year to year, but what was something you learned through that process?

Trista:

Definitely the attention to detail. You really see the Salesforce attention to detail shine when you're working on something that is executive level like the Salesforce Innovation Center. And making sure that those meeting rooms felt executive even though they were temporary builds that we popped up for four days and we want to make sure that if they're going from one executive experience at Dreamforce to another closed door executive experience, that those experiences also feel the same. So it was sharing wood samples across teams and sharing fabric samples across teams just to make sure that that experience is really cohesive and feels really white glove.

Brandon:

A lot of cross team collaboration there making sure that attendee experience is consistent across these different touch points. The stakes are high. These are the VIPs coming in. What systems do you have in place to speak with one another? Did you have regular check-ins or just a very active messaging thread?

Trista:

The Dreamforce machine actually runs in a really fascinating way around keeping cohesion at Dreamforce. There's a huge creative team that puts out a style guide for everybody. On some areas we are getting down into the super details like same fabric, same pillows, same wood grain, but in general across Dreamforce there's a style guide where the creative team and the agency does get also that detailed to a certain level to make sure that the couches all across campus, whether they're in the Marriott, the Hilton or Moscone look the same and feel the same and the banners look and feel the same.

In some areas you get really, really detailed to make sure the experience is 100% seamless. But luckily the Dreamforce machine makes sure everything is pretty cohesive looking no matter where you go.

Brandon:

I think that's really important. We often hear about documents like this being created for huge event series, but it's amazing that just this one event has so much activity going on throughout it that you need to have those same guidelines and alignment for all these different details.

We talked about how your responsibilities changed over the course of your career at Salesforce, but from your perspective, how has Dreamforce itself changed in the past four or five years?

Trista:

Definitely Dreamforce has changed over the past few years. Even looking back to my first year to where it was this past year, even though I'm not on the team, but just walking around campus, the changes are massive. The first most obvious creative change is that my first two Dreamforces, there was no Trailhead theme, which now is really the whole company branding and identity.

Brandon:

I was just in the lobby and there were trees everywhere.

Trista:

Exactly. There's trees, it's a forest. Dreamforce now is pretty much its own national park. When I started Dreamforce still had its own individual creative identity per Dreamforce. My first year, it was a hex year, so there were all these hex shapes and we had this big inflatable structure that went over the Dream Park to keep from rain and it was a lot of customer photography and a lot of focus on the products and obviously now if you go to Dreamforce, you are in a national forest because Trailhead identity has taken over. That creative shift has changed. I honestly think the creative change to Trailhead has made the whole conference more cohesive and it's a much more fluid experience as you walk around campus. So I think that change was definitely for the better.

Brandon:

It's interesting with the Trailhead theme, did that start with Dreamforce or did that start from a larger Salesforce initiative?

Trista:

Yeah, actually Trailhead started out in our developer world in our admin world and it started off as just very aesthetic theme for the developer admin community. And then the first year, I think it was 2016 at Dreamforce, the Trailhead Team, their experience was Trailhead. So the developer zone at Dreamforce took on the trees, the bears, the squirrels, and the executives really liked that and Mark thought it was really brave that we were just able to throw a critter or a mascot on something and it made people really happy. When he saw that, that brought so much joy to people, we decided to start expanding that and seeing what people thought of it and now it's everywhere.

Brandon:

What's maybe another interesting fact that some attendees of Dreamforce might be surprised to know?

Trista:

I honestly think people are really surprised when they hear about the size of the team that works on Dreamforce. When I was on the team it was six people that produced the show. Obviously there's a bunch of creatives, people that work on the keynote, an agency that works with us all year long, but really it was six people. Now I think they've grown to eight people, but really the lead producers that run the show is a very lean team because a lot of the year we're just floating things along, carrying things big longterm planning. It's not really until the six months out that things really start to need to be super staffed up, but it's a pretty lean team that runs the whole program, which is pretty impressive.

Brandon:

That is and I imagine that the lead time on the event, do they start planning it 11 months ahead, or 12 months ahead?

Trista:

Pretty much always in planning. I mean we have dates for the next 10, 20 years so we know when it's going to be. And there are some things that always need to be going on with the hotel room blocks, relationships with the city and the travel board to make sure that we have what we need, we know what's coming up in the city if there's going to be construction or if Moscone is going to change again. Those are always interesting challenges, but there's some things that never stop planning with Dreamforce.

Brandon:

Let's talk about Salesforce Ventures where you are now. What events are you producing there, and what is the audience that you're speaking to?

Trista:

Our events are mainly focused on bringing together the CEOs from our portfolio. Making sure that they are connected to other CEOs in the program, to Salesforce execs, to people in Salesforce that can help them to navigate how to connect better and build on Salesforce. And the events, we're still experimenting and figuring out what is the right fit for us. Right now it looks like a couple of thought leadership conferences, lots of small focus dinners, a few sponsored and partnered events and things like that. Most important thing is just trying to bring the community together since the program's new and figure out what works for us.

Brandon:

Mentioned experimentation, I understand that's really important because this program is newer. When you are experimenting with different sorts of events, what are you looking at in order to gauge success? Maybe we could take a look at specifically Dreamforce and how Salesforce Ventures has had a presence there over the past couple of years or so.

Trista:

Dreamforce is a great example. As I mentioned, the program is super new, so 2018 was the first year that Salesforce Ventures had a real presence at Dreamforce as a brand. We decided to model off a few of the other executive programs that exist at Dreamforce and combine them to offer hospitality, a meeting space and some content for our guests.

So we really went big at Dreamforce our first year really not knowing what was going to be needed or wanted from our community. And so we had six meeting rooms. We had this big robust way to book into the meeting rooms in advance of Dreamforce. We had two coffee bars and it was great. It was beautiful, it was pretty successful as far as the execution and we had good traffic, but it just felt a little too big for us. Our program was still young, the portfolio is fairly small still. We felt like we found what they needed but maybe went too large.

We did a survey, we got some feedback, kept talking with my team on how we should prioritize and so then this year for Dreamforce we took a step back, decided to prioritize my team and my team's meetings first and then would make space for the portfolio as needed. We scaled back to two meeting rooms, one coffee bar and just a lounge for about 60 people. The nice thing there is that it really felt full and busy all the time and we got a lot of good feedback for just a more simple more startup approach, which sometimes the Salesforce brand can feel like this big overwhelming behemoth and really we want Ventures to feel approachable and still feel like we're in touch with the startup culture there.

So we learned some lessons. We really I think nailed it this year at Dreamforce by just taking a smaller, more analog approach. I feel like I've had two bowls of porridge right now. I've got one that was too hot and one that was maybe a little too cold and next year we're going to come back and really find that sweet spot.

Brandon:

Another big event for Salesforce ventures is Connect Cloud One which is done in partnership with the prestigious VC firm Excel. How have you experimented with this event over time?

Trista:

Connect Cloud One is a CEO thought leadership conference that we've done with Excel for two and a half years now. They did one version before I joined the program, which was a very small first stab at the program. And then when I came on we were going to do our first one in New York.

The challenge with this program, there were so many to begin with, the way the team is structured, so Excel brings event leads from their offices. So there's one in London and there's one in Palo Alto, and then I'm the ventures representative. And then each office also has their partner executive stakeholders who are really our approvers for the project.

So it already starts out hard because there's three leads and three partners and everybody wants different things and one of the teams is across the pond. So there's a time difference. So trying to pull the program together the first time around was just so hard across all the teams. What did people want? Our portfolios are different sizes and so that means some CEOs need different content than some other CEOs, depending on the size of their company. We needed to put an agency together, but also one thing about partnering with outside firms is sometimes there's some budget challenges or not everyone sees eye to eye.

So our first stab at it together in New York was hard because we had three venues. The staff was split up. We still pulled off a pretty impressive program that everybody was happy with, so from the guest side, everybody was really giving us positive feedback, but we knew on the back end that there were still a lot of bugs that we needed to work out. We collected a lot of feedback, regrouped, started a lot earlier for this year, decided to go back to one venue. We even broke our rule about going into a hotel. We don't usually do events in hotels, but we found a great one that we thought matched our brand and we felt like we were just going to trap all these attendees in one location. That was a much smoother approach. Also, we had the template from the previous year to help and we had already worked together once.

We're still learning. I think content creation for us is still a really big challenge. Figuring out what the CEO's want to hear, getting speakers that fit those check boxes and then having all the partners approve those and still making sure there is enough portfolio representation across both portfolios. That is a battle I think we're going to fight in the third year, but I'm going to experiment again and try a new way of putting the content together and bringing all the partners together for a big brainstorm instead of constantly brainstorming throughout the content creation process.

Still experimenting, still learning, but I think year three is going to be perfect.

Brandon:

Great, wonderful, perfect bowl of porridge. So I mean you're working with these different event leads, different partners like you mentioned. What are some ways that you've found to be successful for gaining consensus when making these strategic decisions about this program?

Trista:

I think one of the biggest things I did to try and keep everything a little more neutral was bringing in an agency where we maybe had not had one before or even if it was a stretch on the budget, bringing in a scrappy agency that really can just be that neutral party in between both sides and getting both parties on the SOW so that the agency represents both clients is really important so that there's somebody who's mediating any of the conflicts that we come up with. So that was one thing that I've taken as a learning this year.

It can be really hard. I think working with outside VCs presents a lot of opportunities for me to learn from them because I don't come from the VC world, but it can be really challenging because a lot of the VC world doesn't always see the value in events or the money that is needed to get the value out of the event. I am having to do a lot of education and it's slow education and sometimes I don't win the battle. I don't win the pitch, but I think slowly educating people over the years of our relationship is moving that needle.

Brandon:

You can just point to Dreamforce. I mean look how successful that is. Come on guys events. If only it were that easy.

Trista:

My executive jokes that I should just carry around like a Dreamforce badge and so whenever people are second guessing my events he's just like, "Just show them the Dreamforce badge."

Brandon:

What are some other partner events that you plan on investing in, in the future?

Trista:

We're just starting to work on our 2020 plan for next year and I think we'll still stick to the couple of the partnered events that we already do, but I think we're going to be looking to lean into more focused topics. So I think partnering with other VCs who want to host CXO events that are really, really targeted.

We recently hosted an event with Ridge Ventures. It was just a small evening event, but it was around APIs and the API ecosystem, which is just really specific. And they had a great night getting really techie and really specific on APIs, which really doesn't even mean anything to me. But we see a lot of success from that because it's community building, but it's people who are really passionate around one specific topic. So I think we're going to be looking to do more of that too with VCs who are interested in getting really specific or really verticalized.

And then we're still going to keep working on ways to partner and support diversity inclusion events. We need to diversify our pipeline, our founders, our portfolio a lot, and we're still getting our brand out there into those communities that we invest that we want to invest in you. Of course, because it has to be built on Salesforce or work with Salesforce in some way, that can be a little bit tricky because our investment thesis is specific, but really we're looking to just get our name out there to women founders, black founders, Latin founders who may be interested in working with Salesforce.

Brandon:

And I understand that there are already some events that you've been staging to further this mission of diversity and inclusion.

Trista:

It's really important to the team this year, so we have done a few events this year that focus on giving back and creating community. One event that we do every year that we really love is called the Cloud Gives Back and it's a big volunteer day. We do one in the Bay area and one in London and we have about 300 plus volunteers and it's one event where we actually, we go below the sea level, we invite all the employees from all the portfolio companies to come and participate. We do a half day of volunteering in the community and so that's a really special day. We've been doing that for a few years now.

This past summer our team hosted a group of students from Hidden Genius. Hidden genius is an organization that teaches young black men in high school entrepreneurship skills, leadership skills and computer science skills. And this group was getting ready to put their first stage of their business plans together for app that they were learning to build. So we hosted about 20 of them here with my team and we practiced their pitches with them. We educated them a little bit more about venture capital and how to build that team that you're looking to get. That was a really cool day and an organization that we're going to partner with a lot more.

Just this past October we hosted and sponsored Culture Shift Labs Weekend, which is an annual event that Culture Shift Labs does and it was the biggest gathering of black VCs and Latinx VCs and that was in New York. And that was an incredibly impressive group of people that we were really glad to get our brand in front of and get to know.

So we're working, we're brainstorming, we're always trying out new diversity and inclusion events that we want to participate in and be a part of just to help keep growing our community.

Brandon:

I understand it's a fun situation right now on the SFV Events Team. How would you describe your approach to collaborating with your agencies?

Trista:

I try to have a very collaborative approach, when working with my agencies. For the first few years of my career I didn't really have agencies so I really appreciate when I do have them and the elevation that they can bring to a program. I am a pretty hands on client onsite and I'm happy to get involved in whatever is needed and I think by doing that it shows good leadership and shows that we all are here for the same goal.

I also think events are really experience based, so you could have 25 years in events, but if you've really only worked on scheduling certain types of meetings, you have one type of experience. If you've worked in experiential, you have a totally different set of experience. When I work with an agency, I always think the learning is going to go both ways anyway because everybody's experience is so diverse, so I'm going to learn things from them. I'm hopefully going to teach them things and that just makes our relationship that much stronger when we get onsite and we're all having to work together.

Brandon:

Who is someone you look up to in events, marketing or business in general?

Trista:

I definitely think I'm very fortunate to be surrounded by honestly some of the best world class events people at Salesforce. So I feel fortunate to have seen Dreamforce, worked on Dreamforce, worked with some of that team.

And then outside of Salesforce I think it's hard to drive a lot of brand love for B2B events. So I think it's easy to find a consumer example. And I don't know if you know Johnny Cupcakes?

Brandon:

I don't, but I feel like I should-

Trista:

Really well known on the East Coast. I find a lot of West Coasters don't know him, but he has a shop in Boston and a few others. And I've been following him since college. It's an apparel brand and it's really like apparel that is cupcake designs. But he has created this incredible community, a cult community of people who are obsessed with his designs, who will line up outside the store for a limited edition T-shirt and the store looks like a bakery. So people get mad at him and they're very confused sometimes why they can't buy cupcakes at the Johnny Cupcake Store. And he responds so graciously to them.

And then he also for his community hosts events, often do a lot of movie premiers and gives out swag and people are just lining up around the block to go see like Karate Kid, which they've already seen like 15 times, but they're going to do it with Johnny Cupcakes and with a new T-shirt. And that I think is really impressive and he's still find some new fresh ways to keep the brand going. So I think that's pretty fun. And I think it's funny when people get frustrated because they can't buy cupcakes because that's the fun part of the brand.

Brandon:

Very cool. So will we have a Salesforce Venture cupcakes event to look forward to?

Trista:

Yeah, I hope so.

Brandon:

No baking, just apparel. If you could go back earlier in your career and give yourself one piece of advice, maybe when you're at AOL, maybe earlier, what would it be, and why?

Trista:

I would probably remind myself that the years of experience you have do not equal the experience in your years. And definitely trying to make the jump from New York to San Francisco from AOL to whatever was next, I felt like in those three years at AOL I really had, had the full bootcamp experience and I was prepared to be able to plan any type of event that could get thrown at me. But a lot of people just looked at me and said, "Sorry, you've only had three years experience, like how much could you possibly have learned in three years?" And in some event's roles in three years, you really still are only learning how to do catering. And that was just not my experience.

And so it was very disheartening and frustrating to hear people tell me that I wasn't experienced, but I felt that I was. I think you see that still when you find a rock star event planner or someone who changes industries, but definitely I think in events you can get all kinds of experience in all kinds of amounts of time. So I try to remind myself that the years are not equal to the experience.

Brandon:

I think that's super important to keep in mind that confidence in yourself and what you've done, especially when you've done quite a bit. That's pretty much our time today. If our listeners are interested in learning more about Salesforce Ventures, the type of events you're running and just following up with what you're doing, how can they keep in touch?

Trista:

Salesforce Ventures has a medium page slash blog, so you can look us up on medium. It's Salesforce-Ventures and then Salesforce Ventures also has a Twitter account if you want to keep up with us in real time you can do that there. And then I am also on Twitter at Trista Myers, and sometimes you can see behind the scenes sneak peaks at events and what I'm up to in San Francisco.

Brandon:

Thank you so much, Trista.

Trista:

Thank you.