IN-PERSON tells the stories behind the world's most daring events and the people who make them happen.

 

GUEST SUBMISSIONS
By Industry
By Topic
By Role
feather_search

08 | Kendyl Wright: Challenging Norms, Battling Anxieties and Doing Cool Sh** with Cool People

  • July 31, 2019
  • 35:28

Kendyl Wright (Founder of LOUDER Experiences) shares her perspectives on working in-house and at agencies, challenging institutional norms, battling anxiety, and her personal journey to founding her own experiential agency.

You can also listen on:

Top Takeaways

1

LEARNING FROM THE BEST: Before she was officially an event marketer, Kendyl had experience in running events and activations from the PR side. To take her expertise to the next level she began working with top-tier firms. “I worked with a lot of bigger clients at Fleishman and then at Octagon, and at both of those organizations, I learned so much about the process of things. They have the best of the best, and so you're constantly challenging each other and thinking about things in new ways.”

2

BUILDING RELATIONSHIPS: Across the different organizations that Kendyl worked for, it was essential for her to build relationships with members both inside and outside of her team to be effective. “I had to let them know that I was on their team. I wasn't there to take their job. I didn't want to be a sales guy. I was there to drive business and to build a brand, and that would only help them meet their goals.”

3

CREATING A DIFFERENT KIND OF CULTURE: Having worked both in-house and agency-side, Kendyl has had a lot of time to figure out the kind of company that she wants to build. The resulting enterprise values both employee agency and the need for a sustainable work/life blend. “The most refreshing thing about going out on my own and opening LOUDER Experiences was that both me and my team, I give them the ability to work how they want, when they want.”

ABOUT Kendyl Wright

Before founding LOUDER, Kendyl worked with heavy-hitting PR and marketing firms like Fleishman-Hillard, Octagon, Inspira Marketing Group and Peppercom. She also has some in-house experience under her belt at Benjamin Moore.

Episode Transcript

BRANDON:

Welcome to IN-PERSON, live at Experiential Marketing Summit 2019. I am sitting with Kendyl Wright, founder and head of experiences at LOUDER, an event or experiential agency. Kendyl, thank you so much for being here today.

KENDYL:

Of course, thank you for having me. I'm so excited.

BRANDON:

Kendyl, how many times have you been to Las Vegas before?

KENDYL:

A million.

BRANDON:

A million.

KENDYL:

I don't know that I can count. I've done CES out here. I've done other trade shows. I've been out here for my 30th birthday. I came out here as a kid. You know, all the things.

BRANDON:

And, you know, Las Vegas, it's a wonderful city.

KENDYL:

Is it?

BRANDON:

It's a complex city.

KENDYL:

Yeah. That's a great word.

BRANDON:

It's a very complex city.

KENDYL:

That's a great word.

BRANDON:

What's one of your favorite things about it though?

KENDYL:

I love that it's nonstop. I love that you can do anything you want at any hour of the day. That's why I love New York City as well. But Las Vegas, just really, you can get gourmet food. You can gamble. You can go to shows. You can do kind of anything you want at all hours of the day. You can relax by the pool. You can meet with people. It's like a good combo.

BRANDON:

So Kendyl, you are the founder of this event agency. I understand that before you ended up working with LOUDER, before you ended up founding it, you worked with other agencies beforehand, and you also worked in-house with a number of different companies. How did you get involved with events?

KENDYL:

So my first job out of college was at a PR firm working in New York City, working on B2B tech, just pitching media relations, and I was bored out of my mind. And so I moved over to a different agency that did more consumer PR, and they said to me, like two weeks into the job, “Hey, we have this sponsorship of Fashion Week. You're going to run it. It's a wine client.”

And I said, “Absolutely not. I'm 22 years old, and I shop at the Gap. I'm not fashionable, and I don't drink wine. I drink Amaretto sours and Bud Light. I cannot do this.”

And they're like, “Well, too bad. You're all we have, so you're going to do it.” And I just fell in love with it. Just looking at it like a puzzle, and saying, okay, we spent this much, but when... Also we were a PR agency. We weren't experiential back then. And so when you look at what the ROI needs to be, we needed to get press coverage. And so how do you get attention? And how do you get media to talk about something when you're one of eight bar sponsors at the largest event that people like Mercedes-Benz and Amex dominate, right?

And so I just started looking at it and like cracking the code of what will people talk about? What will be memorable? What will connect this high-end audience with our day-to-day, and how do we give our day-to-day customer this high-end experience, and how do we kind of cross it? I got addicted to that. I got addicted to kind of solving that puzzle and bringing something to life that is memorable and is driving impact on your consumers, on every end.

After a lot of work on our end, the wine company had tasked our agency with making them more familiar to the millennials and to a fashionable audience, and so three years later, through some tasting events, and through the Fashion Week partnerships, and through some other things we did, we had gotten a ton of press. We were mentioned on Gossip Girl without a paid integration. Again, dating myself, Gossip Girl, but back then it was so huge. It was like the biggest win ever. Ever since then, I fell in love with kind of the events, and it kind of ended up shaping my career.

My background is PR, so I always kind of ended up being that hybrid event, PR person because I understand what the PR teams need. So I worked at some PR agencies and always kind of was recruited or carved out that role of, okay, you have a client. You're doing the press, and the media relations, and the speaking points. When you have those nontraditional touchpoints, I'll run them, and I'll build them, and I'll create them for you.

BRANDON:

So you really ran with it.

KENDYL:

Yeah, I did. My first big tour, which is one of my favorite stories, but was at that same PR firm, and we had a kids' toy brand come to us and say, “Hey, we're going to launch nationally, and we want to be everywhere.” And it was before the big days. Now everyone does tours. Back then, they didn't have money for an ad campaign to reach national, and so my team and I put together a tour of eight markets from New York all the way to L.A.

And I actually bought a school bus off Craigslist, wrapped the school bus with a wrap vendor, designed the costume characters. Basically built the whole tour myself, not knowing what a tour was. Not having any of the resources that today's experiential teams have, and then got on the bus with two interns for three months while still managing my other client.

BRANDON:

Wow. I have so many questions about that. First off, you can buy a bus from Craigslist?

KENDYL:

Well, back then you could. I don't know that I would trust it now. But, yeah, back then I did. It was cheaper than renting, and we wanted it to be a school bus because it was a kids' educational toy. And I just looked. I researched all the options. And again, as a 25-year-old, I bought a school bus and then figured out how to wrap it, and get it to New York City, and drive it. And, yeah, the rest is history.

BRANDON:

So you learned how to drive it as well?

KENDYL:

Oh, yeah. We-

BRANDON:

That's a special license.

KENDYL:

We didn't. So this was where my genius comes in. But we knew that if we went a certain size, so we got the short bus. Because we knew if we went over a certain size, we would all have to get CDLs, and we didn't want to have to get CDLs, so it was a smaller school bus. But we did, me and two 20-year-old interns drove it across the country. It was a wild ride. We hired our brand ambassadors off Craigslist. There weren't staffing agencies at the time, so each market we hired our brand ambassadors. We did all of our partnerships through Myspace messaging. We just called schools up directly, and said, "Hey, can we come to your school?" It was really kind of ground up.

And so later when I went to Octagon, which as everyone knows is the global leader in sports marketing and event marketing... When I went to Octagon, I really went because I wanted to know if I was doing it correctly or not. I had been doing it kind of roguely from PR firms, and I wanted to learn kind of the processes. And, okay, how do you really do this stuff? Because I'm buying buses off of Craigslist and making things happen, and I can always do that.

KENDYL:

And Octagon was great for that because they have everything nailed down to a tee from a process, from an impression analytic standpoint. And then some of the people I worked with have gone on to do incredible, incredible things in the experiential space, so it also was working with the best of the best.

BRANDON:

I love that so much.

KENDYL:

Yeah, it was fun.

BRANDON:

It definitely sounds like you have this resourcefulness, this MacGyverness, to just frigging do whatever it takes to make a campaign happen.

KENDYL:

Yeah. Somehow those are always the projects I get. I don't know that I would call myself MacGyver. I had a old colleague. He is MacGyver.

BRANDON:

Okay.

KENDYL:

I can give him anything, and he can make it incredible. I just have the willpower of like, "We will do this. Whatever your budget is, and it will be the best thing anyone has ever seen," so that's like my driving force.

BRANDON:

Okay, so you've worked with a lot of agencies, including Octagon. During your career working for these different organizations, what are some of those key takeaways that you sort of learned from agency life?

KENDYL:

So Fleishman-Hillard, from PR, I was there when we launched the NOOK reading device, so that was one of those events that's like on the level of an Apple product reveal. We had 300 of the top tier media there. It was all top secret. And so I worked with a lot of bigger clients at Fleishman and then at Octagon, and at both of those organizations, I learned so much about the process of things. I am not a process person. I am a get shit done person, and so those really helped me when I did go in-house to kind of back up, and say, "Okay, let me show you the process of how I got here, and why this is going to work, and how we can measure it."

Both of them were really big about ROI and measurement because they were working for these big global clients that had board members that had bottom lines. They had to show and prove what every dollar was using. And then also just the brain power at agencies like that. They have the best of the best, and so you're constantly challenging each other and thinking about things in new ways that you don't get in corporate America really, unless you have recruited a really strong marketing team. But there's a reason people gravitate to agencies, and then those elite agencies have kind of gotten to the top by getting the best of the best and just having those minds on fire all of the time.

BRANDON:

For sure. So you took a lot of this agency experience you had, and then you also started working in-house for some organizations. What was it like transitioning to that?

KENDYL:

It was definitely different. I went in-house. That was my dream. If you had asked me 10 years ago, "What is your end career goal?" It was to work for a brand. I don't know if you were at the keynote this morning, but Monique... It was to have that type of job, to be at a brand, and Benjamin Moore really came up randomly. I was really happy at my current job and saw this post for Benjamin Moore, and they were reinventing their marketing team.

So they had traditionally been a pretty old school marketing organization, and it was a great chance to... They had an experiential marketing manager role. I was 29 at the time. It was my first six figure job, so it was like a big deal. I was like, "Oh, I've achieved all my dreams. I'm here. I'm set."

And so I went to Benjamin Moore and was immediately met with what now—why I named my company LOUDER Experiences—but immediately met with kind of "be quieter. You know?" "We're calmer. We don't do things as fast here. We have a lot of approval levels. We have a lot of people that need to... Stakeholders that need to buy off on this."

They were very risk-averse, and I am not risk-averse. I don't know that took it away completely, but I really learned how to hone my approach, and how to say, "Okay, this is what I want to do. This is why it makes sense for us, and this is what the spin is going to be, but this is what the ROI is going to be," and go in like that. And then it also was a highly relationship building culture. This is a fake stat, but I would also say that like 85% of their employees are older white males, and strong bossy women of any race don't really fit in, in that culture.

So I would be at trade shows with the C-suite saying like, "No, you need to be here on time because you have to give this, or you have to do this, or you need to stand like this. I want you to wear this." They all wanted to wear their own suits, and I was like, "No, then no one knows who we are like."

So finding ways to kind of work in that infrastructure was a challenge, but we also did some really, really phenomenal things there. Our CMO, he had done work for Visa and Coca-Cola, and he had been brought in to kind of revolutionize their marketing department. So I was able to do things at Benjamin Moore that a brand like Benjamin Moore, you would have never thought would do. So we launched a partnership with the Cubs. We went on as a sponsor of the Cubs. We repainted the Wrigley sign.

BRANDON:

Oh, wow. Everything you're saying right now just has immense sentimental attachment for me right now.

KENDYL:

Are you a Cubs fan?

BRANDON:

I'm a Cubs fan.

KENDYL:

Okay. It was one of the best partnerships I've ever done in my life.

BRANDON:

Wow, this is so cool.

KENDYL:

Yeah. We wanted to announce the partnership, and the PR team came to me and said, "Okay, what can we do other than a press release and whatever?" And so we started talking, and we worked with the facility's director to find out that the original Wrigley marquee was not red, it was green, and so we had our team go out and meet with the facility's director. They found all these old photos. We matched the color, and then for one week when we announced our partnership, we painted it green. Or we did that in the morning, but it stayed green for a week.

And so then we built the experience around that. We invited press out there. Darren Rovell put the time-lapse on his Twitter. USA Today covered it. Everyone was talking about it because the Wrigley marquee is so sentimental to so many Cubs' fans and just is such a national landmark.

And then we had elements for consumers where they could come paint their own bat with the original colors or the current Cub colors. We had T-shirts. We did a stadium takeover where everyone got a T-shirt with our logo and the Cubs' logo painted with a watercolor style.

BRANDON:

This is just, it's-

KENDYL:

It was awesome.

BRANDON:

I guess when I think of paint-

KENDYL:

Yeah.

BRANDON:

I don't think of it being so tactile, but then also being able to find opportunities where people have such like strong emotional connections-

KENDYL:

Yeah.

BRANDON:

Like a sports team and finding ways to integrate with.

KENDYL:

Yeah. The way that sports started for Benjamin Moore is that's where our customer was. So, contractors, we had suites. We had some partnerships where we would take contractors, and various painters, and partners, and retailers and entertain them there. And my team was able to really take that to the next level, and say, "Here are the 70 things that are in our agreement that we're not activating on," and really bring those to life. And then with the Cubs deal, that came straight through David, our CMO, so I was able to help negotiate that and actually asked for what we wanted, and it was a phenomenal partnership.

I do want to back up, and one of the things you mentioned is what it's like to work in a workplace that is predominantly white male and not often having your voice heard. You mentioned that you sort of found ways to negotiate that and to sort of bring people around to see your perspective. What was that like?

KENDYL:

I really had to go into it less aggressively, which is hard for me. I really had to go into it and build relationships with them. So when we went to trade shows, when I was in the office, spending time and getting to know them as people, and letting them know that I was on their team. I wasn't there to take their job. I didn't want to be a sales guy. I was there to drive business and to build a brand, and that would only help them meet their goals.

So I'm still in touch with a ton of people from there today. I think because of that relationship building. One of my favorite humans that I did build a great relationship with is now the CEO. He was the director of sales at the time. And so watching them succeed and seeing that, knowing that... You know, one of the ways I built a relationship with him was his dad was a huge Cubs fan. He was from Chicago, so making sure that everything we did, even if Dan wasn't in town, that his dad got that VIP experience. His dad is, I don't know how old, but much, much older, but would send me like emails with pictures. He was just the cutest man.

I love people at the core of who I am, and that's why I love creating experiences for them. But finding ways to kind of build those relationships and just be who I am naturally, instead of saying like, "No, this is the process, and this is what we're doing, and this is what I was hired for." Which is probably how I came out of the gate swinging, and then quickly realized that I would not get ahead that way, and I would not be able to achieve some of the things that we achieved while I was there.

BRANDON:

Sure. So you worked the agencies. You worked in-house, and you recently founded LOUDER. Why did you decide to create your own organization?

KENDYL:

So many reasons, but overall, being at all the various places that I've been at, I get bored very quickly. I always am looking for the next, most exciting thing. I struggle sometimes with the corporate and office politics, and I started to interact with companies in the startup space and in the experiential space who just weren't doing it the same old way. And I started to kind of say, "Oh, there is a better way," and I've kind of had all these little experiences that I can build, and say, "Okay, I had two years here. I had two years here. Let me take the best parts of all of these things, and build what my dream job is."

I was lucky enough to have the resources to do that. And then most recently, what kind of spurred me on was I worked for a place where the CEO did not have any event experience and was not invested or involved, and I started to just kind of get that like, "I could do it. I could do this on my own without answering to someone who doesn't know what my world is."

And so I started kind of noodling it around, started talking to my boss about leaving. You know making an exit plan. I had a client at the Super Bowl in February, and so I stayed through that, and then I launched in February. It's why I'm in shorts today because now I can do what I want, and make things how I want, and how I envision it.

This is so random, but one of the core things for me about events and experiences is we travel so much. We work so many nights. We work so many weekends. We're away from our family. We're away from our friends. We're away from our bed. And most agencies, including the big guys, have very traditional office hours, so you work 'til 2:00 a.m., but you still need to work a full day in the office the next day.

And I've kind of challenged that my whole career, whether I should have or not, and that to me has been the most refreshing thing about going out on my own and opening LOUDER Experiences was that both me and my team, I give them the ability to work how they want, when they want.

One of my team members flew out here, and she is newly married, and I knew she didn't want to spend a lot of time away from her husband, but I really felt it was important for her to be here, so I said, "Great, skip Tuesday, just come late Tuesday night." She ended up booking a morning flight because it was better for her schedule, but I didn't have any say. Like I didn't care about that, and she kept asking me. She was like, "Are you sure I don't need to wear a suit? Are you sure I don't need to wear business professional clothes?"

I was like, "No, you wear what you're comfortable in. What makes you your best self." And I think that's what I have found is owning my own company and launching LOUDER has made me really be able to lean into the way I do things, and the way I know. Like, I know I can buy a bus and wrap it and do all of this. I know that I can figure out how to sponsor Fashion Week without any fashion experiences and crush it, and it has just really given me that freedom to say like, "Okay, I want to take all of the best pieces from all of the places I've worked and really breathe that in to my clients and into my teams."

BRANDON:

Definitely, it's a very novel approach, but it's something that I personally increasingly hear talking to folks is it's not a nine to five. It's not a nine to six. It's a blend. That's kind of how it is. It's a work-life blend, and it's very-

KENDYL:

Yeah, not a balance.

BRANDON:

Yeah, yeah.

KENDYL:

I mean experiential is never going to be that. I remember at Fashion Week one of the things my boss told me. She was a very old school, New York PR girl, so it makes sense that she said this, but she was like, "Go to every after party you're invited to. You need to build relationships, and you're in New York City. You need to hobnob and blah, blah." I remember staying out 'til 4:00 a.m. and being at the office at 8:30. And that to me is just so crazy.

And I also just have found I am a late night worker just by nature, and that's where my mind works great. If I can get up in the morning, and workout, and have breakfast, and chill, and answer emails, and not feel stressed, and then start my day, I'm way more productive and way happier than when I feel like I need to race just to have my butt in a seat. Like, if somebody needs a meeting at 7:00 a.m., I can be there.

And I want my team to feel that too. I don't want them to ever feel like we're going to run you into the ground because you're going to be at this event for two weeks, and then you're expected to be back here on Monday morning, bright-eyed and bushy-tailed, and go on to the next.

We're always going to have the next, and we're always going to have that lifestyle, so what is that blend that makes you feel empowered and in control of your own life, but also makes you a better human, and better worker, and gives you more creativity. I always have the most creativity when I get rest. You know?

I remember I had an idea at Benjamin Moore, and I cam in... I had been traveling so much because we had a very slim team there. It was me and two interns, and then I later hired a full-time person. But I came into the VP of marketing's office, and I was like, "I have this idea for this big trade show that we do, and here's what we're going to do, and this, and that."

He was like, "Oh, that's amazing. When did you think of that?" I was like, "I had two days off." When your brain is not constantly thinking about what you're doing at that time, you're able to refresh and re-energize and think of the next big thing, or think of the most exciting thing, or how you can do things differently, and that's just really important to me, and I think it's important to the next generation of people.

Every time I interview someone, I make sure... At all of my jobs, I've always done this. I've said, "Listen, if you're looking for a job that you can checkout of at 4:00 or 5:00, 6:00 p.m. every day, or that you never have to travel, events aren't for you. But you have to find a way to make those fuel you, and to move on."

BRANDON:

Excellent. So this makes me think of a few questions for you. One of which is that you mentioned that one of the things that sort of inspired you to found your own company is that you saw a lot of organizations out there doing great things when it came to experiential. Could you tell us maybe one or two individuals who you think are really doing a great job or brands even?

KENDYL:

Yeah, I don't know that I pay as much attention to the individual. But brands, Bumble is just crushing it right now. I think I have their panel on my schedule. I didn't even know they did this coworking space, but just everything they're doing is left and right, just crushing it to their audience. And then to the general consumer, so Match.com was one of my early clients at Fleishman-Hillard, and back then the online dating space was so scary, right? And we did some cool things and kind of brought them into the conversation then, and our goal was to try to make online dating mainstream.

And I do think Match did a lot of strides in that, but Bumble has made it so much more. Like suburban housewives know about Bumble because they partnered with Serena, right? It's like all of these things. Your grandparents know about it because they keep seeing it everywhere. All of these things that they do, and they don't just look at things from an experiential standpoint, they look at things from a holistic standpoint.

Where their field marketing combines into their national marketing, combines into their events, combines into partnerships. They recently launched a magazine, and everyone's getting out of the print space. You know, I think they just have that forward-thinking of here's what our customer wants, and here's how we're going to bring it to life. And they do things so beautifully. I love everything they do. Yeah.

BRANDON:

Awesome. And you've had a lot of experience, so you sort of talked about working for a bunch of different types of organizations. Looking back earlier in your career, what's one piece of advice you would give yourself?

KENDYL:

My gut says to tell myself to be patient, but I think if I was patient, I wouldn't be where I am today. I'm not really a patient person. My other piece of advice would probably be quieter. Don't complain so much. But, again, I wouldn't be here. I was able to change a lot of things at different companies that I worked at, and four different clients, by speaking up.

I think the advice I would give myself was just like, "You got this. Stop being so anxious." I've found a lot of peace the older I've gotten, at all of my companies. In the confidence, in my experience, and in my creativity, and in my ability to execute, that I didn't have when I was younger. You know?

And everyone kind of has that, but I remember just before we launched. So Fashion Week, which hits in September, the fall one, and then we left the Sunday after Fashion Week ended on Friday for the three-month tour of the bus. And I was managing both of those programs and going on the bus tour.

I remember the two weeks leading up to that calling my mom and saying like, "I can't sleep. My mind is just constantly like what if this happens, what if this happens, what if this happens," and I've gotten so much better as I've gotten older, and I would probably tell 24-year-old Kendyl like, "Calm down, if that happens, it's going to be okay."

And I think one of the things I always used to say in interviews when I was job hunting, when they would say, "Oh, what makes you able to do events or whatever?", is that for some reason all of that anxiety leaves whenever I get on an event site. It's like if the pencils don't arrive, I'm never going to be the person that's like, "Everyone's fired because the pencils aren't here." I'm like, "Okay, so we'll buy pencils at CVS, and they won't be branded this year. That's okay."

KENDYL:

I've used that example since I was very young. Because especially in PR, it's always like, "This could go wrong. This is a crisis." And so reminding myself, and telling that person like, "It's going to be okay." And as long as you're flexible and can figure those things out on-site, the people that have succeeded for me the most, that have worked for me, have been the people that kept that calm, and that said, "That's okay. Here's what we'll do." Or this happened, "Oh, well, here's how we'll shift."

Because in live events, that's always going to happen, and in tours that's always going to happen. And being able to handle that and kind of not be anxious about it all the time, where younger Kendyl was just always twisted up about it.

And I found that looking for new clients, I have no anxiety about that. Which someone asked me here yesterday, they were like, "Oh, you had one big client, and you took them from your old agency, and you left and started your own. That's what everyone does." And I was like, "No, actually, I left with no client."

But I've just really been confident in my relationships, and in my experience, and in my product, and what I know my team is able to create that I haven't had that anxiety around like, "What if this doesn't come?" You know sometimes you have that small nagging, but that has clearly been something that I've learned over a lot of time, and if I could have learned that much younger, I probably would have been much less anxious during those nights leading up to my big launches.

BRANDON:

All right, so not to put you on the spot, but LOUDER's out there. It sounds like a very cool company, with a great leader, and a great organizational culture.

KENDYL:

Thank you.

BRANDON:

That embraces that sort of work-life blend a bit more. What's your game plan? Where do you see it going in the next couple of years? And how do you think you'll get there?

KENDYL:

Yeah. No, you're not putting me on the spot. And I actually met with my web development team the other day, and they asked me all those same questions, so I have them all prepared. My game plan is to have four to five full-time employees by early next year, so that will be one year with launch. As I mentioned to you earlier, we have a couple full-time right now, so I'd like to have that... I definitely have revenue goals because I've learned as a business owner, you have to have those.

That's probably my biggest weakness as a business owner. That I'm like, "I just want to do cool shit with cool people. I don't care if they don't have money." And my finance team is always like, "No, they have to have money. You cannot do everything for free." And I'm like, "It's just awesome. I'll do it, like no big deal." So I definitely have revenue goals.

And my dream for LOUDER... I don't have a goal to be an Octagon, or a Momentum, or a Jack Morton. They're so huge, and they're global, and they create amazing things, and that's great for them. I have seen a lot of success in that mid-level agency, and that's where I kind of always gravitate towards.

For me success looks like in three years that no one's asking what is LOUDER? That they know about us. That they refer people to us. And that has been probably the most surprising thing to me and my parents. My dad is in banking, so he always laughs about like, "Oh, I didn't realize you knew this many people," because he just doesn't know this world.

But the referrals have come really fast and furious. I got one from an old client a couple weeks ago that said like, "Oh, this is Kendyl. She'll do everything for you, trust her. She's amazing." And that's what I want for LOUDER too. I've built that kind of on my own with my clients, and with my vendor partners, and different people. I want LOUDER to just be synonymous with, "Oh, they do the coolest shit, and they're easy to work with, and they make us look good." So that is my goal.

And then from a event perspective, I always look at what events do I want to be a part of. The Super Bowl was a big goal of mine. At my role at my last agency, I found the client, won a client, and then won the Super Bowl business. I did that as a part of my old agency in February. So that was, for a sports fan, bucket list, dream activation. Now I'm kind of thinking global, the Olympics, Can.

I haven't really done a lot in the music space, and as Coachella gets bigger and bigger this year, I had a lot of FOMO. I have no desire to attend a music festival, but I had a lot of FOMO from the people who were there because of the brand activation. So I kind of always look at like, what places do I want to be? Where do I want to activate at, and what ideas do I have around those big events? That's kind of what I look at my milestones as.

BRANDON:

Awesome. Well, this is a very exciting time. I'm super pumped for you all.

KENDYL:

You're amazing.

BRANDON:

It's been a lot of fun getting to learn more about LOUDER and your experience. If people want to get in touch with you to learn more about LOUDER or just chat, how can they do that?

KENDYL:

They can email me. It's probably the easiest. I probably shouldn't give my cell phone number out on a podcast.

BRANDON:

Yeah, yeah. You can avoid that.

KENDYL:

They can email me. It's kendyl, K-E-N-D-Y-L, @louderexp.com. So louderexperiences.com, kendyl@louderexp.com. My website also has a contact form. It's under development right now because I have this badass web agency. I cannot wait to see what they build. It's under development, and I've had to be patient. Again, back to the patience. My web guy was like, "No, I can't give this to you in two weeks." And I was like, "Yeah, no, I need it tomorrow." So I have a contact form on there as well if that's easier, and my website is louderexp.com.

BRANDON:

Awesome. Thank you so much Kendyl.

KENDYL:

Thank you. This was amazing. So fun.