IN-PERSON is a podcast series that tells the stories behind the world's most daring events and the people who make them happen.

Music by Winesap.

 

GUEST SUBMISSIONS
By Industry
By Topic
By Role
feather_search

38 | Donna Stewart, National Urban League: Voting, Influencers, and Driving User Experience with Virtual Events

  • November 11, 2020
  • 32:18

Donna Stewart (VP of Events Management, National Urban league) shares her passion and tips for focusing on the end-user experience with virtual events, the role of timelines and time management in virtual broadcasts, and the access that virtual events afford when it comes to featuring speakers and influencers that resonate with your audience.

You can also listen on these platforms:

Top Takeaways

1

CREATING MEMORABLE END-USER EXPERIENCES: “The end-user experience is what really gets me going as well...The keyword [is] engaging experience. You really want to hold your audience because everyone is doing virtual…we try to meet our audience...in whichever way we can get the message out.”

2

USING EVENTS TO PUSH POWERFUL MESSAGES: “We also did an amazing partnership with BET last week. We had Master P on the platform with my boss...The people who really don't vote are 18 to 24-year-old males. So someone as strong as Master P and who has such a big and great influence in his community was just a perfect match for us in order to be like, ‘Hey. We're talking about this. This is what's going on in the world. But we have to focus on voting.’ We try to touch people in different ways and touch our audience in different ways.”

3

EMBRACING THE ACCESS TO LARGER AUDIENCES AND GREAT SPEAKERS VIRTUAL EVENTS PROVIDE: “We did four really great topics, and we had panelists like Mayor Cantrell and Keisha Bottoms. We had Marc Lamont Hill, who is a great influencer in the world. We had great, amazing people to come on to speak about it...We got more people to watch the conference than we would ever have gotten to actually come to the [physical] event ...this year, we were able to reach 80,000 people virtually.”

ABOUT Donna Stewart

As the Vice President of Events Management at National Urban League, Donna Stewart brings over 20 years of experience developing brand strategies for experiential touchpoints for consumers, managing multi-million dollar budgets, and leading teams of production professionals. Donna has produced events for brands like Essence, Black Enterprise, and Disney—before taking the helm of Events Management at the National Urban League. Well before COVID-19 forced event organizers to go virtual, Donna and her team have staged live broadcasts and virtual events on behalf of the organization.

Episode Transcript

BRANDON:

Donna, welcome to the show.

DONNA:

Thank you, Brandon. How are you?

BRANDON:

Doing all right. It's a little chilly because it's that time of year, but good all things considered. I wanted to start off today's discussion with something that's, as often we do on the show, talking about something that's not so related to events. I understand that music holds a very special place in your heart and that you also are known to have dances that are choreographed for pretty much any song out there.

DONNA:

That is a fact.

BRANDON:

It's hard to say one song in particular, but do you have top-five, top-10, or maybe even what you're listening to now?

DONNA:

Do I necessarily have a top-five or 10 that I can spill out right now? No. I really do mean, Brandon, if a song comes on for some strange reason as I'm singing the song or even listening to the song, I for some reason go straight into choreography in my head for the song and I have no idea why. There are times I've really focused and concentrate on not having that, and it still pops up. If you put on anything New Edition, anything Mariah Carey, we can go to Cardi B, Jay Z, there is a song, there is a dance, there's a full choreography in my head for the song. It's a little weird, but it happens.

BRANDON:

This to me, it's like a superpower. When did you first discover that you had the superpower?

DONNA:

I think I was in college, maybe it was a distraction. Sometimes when I was in a class that was boring, and I just started singing in my own head and then having a dance routine to go with it. But yeah. It's just been with me ever since.

BRANDON:

Oh, wow. It seems like all superpowers, it's a blessing but also in some ways a curse.

DONNA:

Correct.

BRANDON:

Is it hard to listen to music while you're working? Because you go into choreography?

DONNA:

I don't do it at all because it would distract me. Yes. I will be stuck on whatever it is I'm doing. I will be trying to write an email for an hour because I'm in my head dancing.

BRANDON:

Very cool. I guess my last question there is did you ever formally study choreography, or is it something that you just sort of-

DONNA:

Not at all. Because I'm so uncoordinated, maybe that's the problem. Maybe that's why I'm doing it in my head. Because in real life, I am uncoordinated.

BRANDON:

Yeah. It's easier to envision it in the mind.

DONNA:

Absolutely.

BRANDON:

Cool. Well, let's talk about something where you are totally amazing at coordinating and that's with events and production. I know that before joining the National Urban League, where you are today, you worked on the agency side at Noelle-Elaine media where you manage events for brands like Essence Magazine, Black Enterprise, and Disney. Way before that, you studied political science. So all that is to say, how did you first enter into the world of events?

DONNA:

Well, my very first job out of college I became a coordinator. What I did was really put together meetings for high-level officials in the organization that I was working for. So it just became a thing that I did, and I realized I was really good at it. Then, when the opportunity came up at Noelle-Elaine Media, I jumped right on it and I was fortunate enough to land the position. That's where I really honed in on my event-planning skills, production skills, and really it became what I loved.

BRANDON:

Wow. So in one way, shape, or form, you're doing this right out of the gates of school to some extent?

DONNA:

Correct. Correct. I was very fortunate in that way in really finding out what my passion was after school. So yeah. I wanted to go to law school so that's why I studied political science, but that never came to fruition. The next best thing, and it really told me what my passion was. It showed me what my passion was.

BRANDON:

So through that time, either in that first gig right out of the gates of school or at Noelle-Elaine, what were some of the things that really stuck with you and you found to be formative as you began to shape your career as an events professional?

DONNA:

I realized that I have a great attention to details capability, and I love to see an ideation and to be able to execute it and see it fully formed and come to its end in what it is. It really excites me. It gets me going. There's something about that just to know there's an end to it. There's an end where people will see it, will hopefully enjoy it, and take away something from it. That really just excites me, and it makes me actually become a better even person because every time I execute an event, I take notes for the next one. "Well, what can make this better? How can I improve upon what I'm doing?"

BRANDON:

So really honing those skills of not only the organization and coordination, but taking those notes, experimenting, and iterating on-

DONNA:

Absolutely, the end-user experiences and that would be the audience, the attendees is what really gets me going as well. Just to know that they're enjoying the event, they actually love the look and feel of the event, their entire experience was a great experience, that's what makes me happy at the end of it all.

BRANDON:

Definitely. Is there a specific event, I mean, during your time with Noelle-Elaine that really stood out as being a landmark project that you worked on? I know we shared some of the brands you worked with at the top at Essence Magazine, Black Enterprise, and Disney, among others.

DONNA:

Essence, really, they had this powerful event called Women Who Are Shaping the World, and the content was just really amazing. It was just being able to help them put that together and help them with the ideation of it, and putting it together, and executing on it was really just powerful in content and all of the wonderful, and amazing people that attended, and were participants of that. But also, my trip to Africa, we had a client and the work was in Africa that we had to do, that was just an experience within an experience. It was an experience professionally, but it was also an experience personally. Those were really two of the clients, let's say, that I really enjoyed working on and working with.

BRANDON:

Where did you visit in Africa?

DONNA:

My work with Noelle-Elaine and taking me to Africa with this particular client, took me to Africa about five different times in five different countries.

BRANDON:

Oh, wow.

DONNA:

Yeah. So it was great. It was really amazing. And it elevated me to show me that I can really do international events as well and rely on my instincts, and rely on my gut in terms of getting stuff done in those particular continents, and just really being able to get vendors together over there and put together the event and execute on the event.

BRANDON:

Yeah. I know with a previous guest on the show, Sarah from Rakuten, we were talking about how some of her experiences staging events in different countries, and it seems like it's a whole new learning curve in terms of building those relationships with vendors and other partners to help put everything on...

DONNA:

Oh, absolutely.

BRANDON:

... being mindful of the unique customs or our ways of doing things.

DONNA:

Correct. Yes. Oh, the customs, you really had to, yeah, get your finger on that to really guide you through the process.

BRANDON:

You had a, I'd say, interesting career at Noelle-Elaine Media for some time and then you eventually ended up where you are today here at the National Urban League, which is a historic civil rights organization dedicated to economic empowerment, equality, and social justice. At the National Urban League, you've produced events and TV broadcast for the better part of about 12 years. So for some of those of our listeners who are not as familiar with the National Urban League, could you provide us with a little bit more context on the organization and your current responsibilities there?

DONNA:

Sure. We are a civil rights organization, and we collaborate at the national-local level with community leaders, policymakers, and our corporate partners to elevate the standards of living for underserved communities. We provide direct services, services such as job training, workforce development, housing assistance, education assistance, and entrepreneurship. We have several entrepreneurship centers around the country so we directly serve the underserved communities.

BRANDON:

I know that one of the ways that you are serving these communities, and not only directly but also providing greater awareness with some of the different initiatives that you're working on, is through events. I know that like many other organizations out there that the National Urban League has recently turned to virtual events to fill that gap for in-person. But unlike a lot of these other companies, National Urban League and yourself already had some previous experience on the broadcast side of things, which I think is just huge when we're talking about virtual and everything that people are experimenting with and doubling down on now.

BRANDON:

Specifically, I know that you co-produced the National Urban League's State of Black America TV show on TVOne, and also turned the State of Black America Report into an annually-recurring broadcast event that went on for several years. So I know we're kind of jumping around chronologically a little bit, but could we start with the TV show? And how you got involved with this organization producing events for them, but having this opportunity to create a TV show based on all the work that you're involved with.

DONNA:

Sure. Because the State of Black America and our report is such great, phenomenal content, we had a partnership with TVOne. It was a partnership cultivated by a colleague, and they were very interested in since they had a broadcast platform, they needed content. They were like, "This would be great content to be able to provide to our viewership. So, would you guys be interested in developing this TV show?" And from there, we dove in and we really created a great, I would say, broadcast for TVOne with the report, the State of Black America Report. Because there's so much content inside of that report that we were able to easily turn it into a show that will provide great content for the viewership, for the audience.

BRANDON:

Some of these clips are out on the internet so, folks, feel free to check them out. But it was something that was, on the one hand, very different, but on the other hand, somewhat similar when we think about some of the virtual event broadcasts that we see today. I know in a little bit, we're going to talk about the State of Black America Report in the virtual broadcast for 2020. Going back to the TV show, there's this combination of direct-to-camera speaking but also some segments that were recorded elsewhere and infusing them together.

DONNA:

Yes. It was a great experience doing this. My colleague and I, we really took ownership of it with the approval and just our boss wrapping her hands around us. Because she was also from a broadcast background, and my colleague has broadcast background as well. So we all just hunkered down, figured out how we would put this together, and we involved our affiliates because we have 90 affiliates around the country. So they're the one who really are doing the groundwork for us. So what we did, we took camera crews just to tell their story, and their story leads into the report of the State of Black America, where we are in terms of housing, where we are in terms of jobs, where we are in terms of education. A lot of our affiliates, in their community, they have programs that wrap their arms around the pillars that we have at the National Urban League. And they have programs that we were able to highlight and showcase on the show.

BRANDON:

So really bringing those partners, those affiliates into the experience of the broadcast as well. As somebody with primarily an event background working on a variety of different events, by this point, you'd also traveled for some, worked on events elsewhere, but coming this broadcast setting, I know it can be very much a different experience. It sounds like you had some great support from your colleague and from your boss there. What were some of the things that you found were definitely required learning about a different area of expertise?

DONNA:

It wasn't something that actually required a new learning. But what I did realize is that timeframes are very important in broadcast. You really have to meet those deadlines, those timelines, because you're up against schedules that are already in place. So we had to really work double-time, sometimes overtime, sometimes way into the night because we had to get all of this together. We had to piece it together because as you know, some was recorded separately to have it in place to go the day of the show. So just in terms of getting everyone coordinated, being able to get to... I had to fly to Florida to record a piece. We had to go to Chicago to record a piece. So just in that, it was time management in terms of really following a time management timeline to really get this completed, and just really to stay on top of things, and really nothing could fall through the cracks.

DONNA:

Also, of course, in live production, it's live so you really want it to go well and you want it to run smoothly. But, of course, there's always hiccups. But I think we tried to think of worst-case scenarios in advance. So we were able to roll and meet our timeline in the venue that we were in also recording the show.

BRANDON:

I mean, it sounds like what you're saying right now, I think it speaks so much to I think what a lot of folks in the events industry are going through right now with once COVID hit, there was that very rapid pivot that people had to make. And like yourself, maybe they had an event date that they canceled, or they had to push back, or in some cases, they moved it up so that it would be part of a virtual experience at a specific time but then very quickly having to adjust to that new timeline and working with all this coordination, probably fewer air flights, but still lots of coordination and mixing that prerecorded and live element, which can be stressful.

DONNA:

Mm-hmm (affirmative). Very.

BRANDON:

Were are you often on set when the live recording was going on?

DONNA:

Yeah, it had to be. I was one of the lead producers, so I had to be there. So anything that was live when we were able to do live, I was there. I was one of the producers for the show. So I saw it from the beginning to the very end. We'd close the lights, put them down, and everyone walked out the theater or wherever we were taping. Absolutely, yes. If it's a live event, even if I have a team, no matter, even in other live events, I'm usually the last person to walk out but the first to walk in.

BRANDON:

Right. Just making sure it all gets done?

DONNA:

Absolutely.

BRANDON:

Taking some steps back, in 2013 to 2016, I know that there was also an annual release that televised on C-SPAN for the State of Black America Report. In comparison to some of your experiences with the TV show, what were some of the things that you picked up and learned in this process of getting it off the ground and working on it?

DONNA:

When we did the Report, the Report released in 2013 through 2017, we usually did that Report release as a press event. I say event because we made it an event. We would usually have a press conference to release the report. With that press conference, it became like an event because we had speakers, we had panelists, we have people who speak about it. Usually, the press would come and cover it like C-SPAN. C-SPAN would take a snippet of it or maybe use all of it at times, and then showcase it on the backend and air it to say, "Hey, the National Urban League has released their State of Black America, and this is what it is."

DONNA:

We've had full coverage from C-SPAN or we have had snippets, but we've also had coverage from major networks as well in terms of using clips of our release to push it out nationally. But then in 2017, we transitioned and made the report in not only a press event, but we also did a full-blown production on it and made it a television show called the State of Black America as well in partnership with TVOne.

BRANDON:

So then I know that eventually, with the report, you in August 2020, the National Urban League launched the 2020 edition of the State of Black America Report. With that, there was a virtual broadcast.

DONNA:

Yes. We really had to pivot like everyone else because live events were no longer happening. So we did a full pivot on, "This is a report that has to get out. It is so important to not only the National Urban League but just to, I believe, the nation." So we decided instead of not doing anything, we went to the pivot of doing it virtually. What we did was we did it like a production, like if we were producing still a TV show with something, but it was just shown. Our live space was the website and all social media platforms.

BRANDON:

In some ways, it seems like it borrows from your experience with the TV show and with the press event. But in some cases, it was a little different. Could you speak about some of the similarities and differences from that previous broadcast experience?

DONNA:

With the virtual space, you had to decide, "Oh, well, where are we going to show it? What platform are we going to use?" So the platform, of course, was different. So that in itself was trying to figure out which platform would work best for us. Do we do live-live? Do we do live to tape? And you have to remember, we had to produce this just the very start of COVID. We didn't really have time to see what other people were doing, how it was going, how these live spaces worked. Was Zoom really working? Did people get cut off? Were people familiar, the people that we'd have as panelists, were they familiar in getting themselves set and together to tape live-live, for us to go live?

DONNA:

So what we decided was we would tape it to live, meaning we came up with our panels, we did about four different panels segments on four different topics covered in the State of Black America Report, and we also broadened it to what was happening with George Floyd and just what was happening in the world. So we did four really great topics, and we had panelists like Mayor Cantrell and Keisha Bottoms. We had Marc Lamont Hill, who is a great influencer in the world. So we had great, amazing people to come on to speak about it. But what we did was tape it, and then we just aired it. We chose a date that we would air it, but we also asked some of the panelists to come back.

DONNA:

What they did was as the segment was running on our platforms, they were able to respond to answer questions if anyone had questions. So it really felt live-live to people, but it was recorded. Because up until this day, people will call me and be like, "Oh, which platform did you use to make a live?" I was like, "No, it was actually taped." Yeah. I mean, kudos to the team, our team, but also our amazing vendors who understood what we were looking for, understood the level of excellence that we strive to always execute at the National Urban League, and they were able to do it.

BRANDON:

Yeah. I mean, I was looking back at some of the recording, and I could've sworn it was live.

DONNA:

Yeah. Thank you. That's what we wanted to get across to showcase.

BRANDON:

Yeah. Having that live Q&A component too, I know that's something that some organizations are experimenting with as well for those prerecorded sessions.

DONNA:

Yes. And trust me, we did a lot of research. There were a lot of nights we stayed up, and we would all just watch. Myself, and my amazing team, and my amazing boss, we would send each other, "This person's doing this live. Let's check it out. Let's see what it looks like. Let's see how it goes." One of the things that we always found, there was always a technical issue. In every one that we joined, there was always a technical issue. We were like, "Oh my goodness. Oh, we don't want this to happen." That's how the decision was made to curate it. I mean, we had editors and production team on this so once we taped, it looks amazingly live. Also, one of the major components is to really ask your panelists if they can come back and answer, respond to questions when it's planned so then it gives it the element of seaming live again.

BRANDON:

Speaking of that production side of things, how do you think about production and other elements of an event, especially now that we're in this virtual space, but how do you think about using those to create an engaging experience?

DONNA:

That's the key word, engaging experience. You really want to hold your audience because, I mean, everyone now is doing virtual. So you have so many different things to pick from and decide what you're going to watch, and what you're not going to watch, what you're going to engage in, so I think you have to figure out, become very creative in how you're putting it out. What's the content, I think also drives the seriousness of what you're doing. So if it's really serious, we try not to do too much creative nuances to it because we want the message to hit home or drive home. But what we would look to do is really have really great subject-matter experts, someone who can really speak to what we are speaking about, and have the information so people can really get the information that they need. Now and then, we'll make sure we just have top-notch people who can speak to what it is that we're trying to convey.

DONNA:

If it's something light, then we'll incorporate some form of entertainment component. We did something with H.E.R., the music artist, and that was just to kind of introduce people to who the National Urban League is who may not know who we were. It was just H.E.R. on a soundstage singing her songs but also talking about our organization, and what we do, and what services we can provide, and how they can turn to us for help. So that was another amazing just pivot for us as well.

DONNA:

We also did an IG Live with MC Lyte, again, to encourage people to vote, encourage people to fill out the census form, but also there was some fun component to it. It was an entertainment. She was playing music, DJ-ing for us on IG Live, but my boss, my president, CEO came in, spoke about us, please telling people to vote, telling people fill out the census. So it also conveyed the seriousness of what we do.

BRANDON:

That's very cool. I know before we started recording, we were talking about some of the work that you are doing right now. Is today National-

DONNA:

National Voter Registration Day, yeah. Through all of our social media platform, we already pushed out all of the elements of what you need to know in order to vote. Make sure that you have everything together so you can get yourself to the voting poll and vote. Please vote. Yes. We also did an amazing partnership would BET last week, Friday, as well. We had Master P on the platform with my boss. We had major performing artists, just people who can get the word out into their communities and where they're revered. Master P's revered in New Orleans, happened to be where my president, CEO's from as well. So it was just getting the message out so people can know, "Hey, voting is coming up. It's very serious." We have to take it very serious this year. But at the same time, we try to meet people, meet our audience because we have young audience, we have an older audience, so just try to meet our audience in whichever way we can get the message out. We try to do that.

BRANDON:

You found Instagram Live to be really helpful here?

DONNA:

Instagram Live is very helpful, yes. Facebook Live also has been really helpful to our organization as well. It has really lifted us up, but also, I think content has also been an amazing driver for people to really find us, and to get to know who we are, and understand that the work that we provide. So it's been very helpful to us.

BRANDON:

Yeah. I love that idea of with virtual events, what's so great right now is we have such a broad audience of folks we can reach out to across the country, depending on the aims of an organization, across the world. We could speak to that really broad audience and at the same time, there are these shifts, and people are becoming more used to that virtual medium as an attendee or as somebody who is consuming information. But something I haven't heard so much is this idea of even though you're broadcasting virtually to also plan with a local component of thinking about, "What are those local elements that we can bring in, even if we're not all live there at an event, bringing in a Master P or somebody else who's known and respected within a community?"

DONNA:

Correct. Yes. Especially, you have to think about your audience sometimes. Even for us, we're trying to reach... The people who really don't vote or 18 to 24-year-old males. So someone as strong as Master P and who has such a big and great influence in his community was just a perfect match for us in order to be like, "Hey. We're talking about this. This is what's going on in the world. But we have to focus on voting." We try to touch people in different ways and touch our audience in different ways.

BRANDON:

One of the things that you spoke on was working with your marketing communications team on the website and that website component of the virtual event, or at least with the State of Black America, 2020 virtual event. What have you found to be helpful? I mean, as you're sort of navigating this, you said yourself the website is the space, it's the venue, it's where it's all happening. It's different territory to be sure. What have you found to be helpful?

DONNA:

The user experience once they log onto your website, the platform, let's say they walk into the venue. The user experience of the website and also to have it not only represent the National Urban League and the people that we serve, but just to be very user-friendly, easy to find, and they're able to find the information that we're pushing out very easily. So I think that's one of the main things. The team is an amazing team, and they really captured the essence of who we are as an organization. But we also stylize it, let's say. They're very creative in how they built out an event page. Once you get to that event page, there's nothing that you would require in terms of not being able to find what you're looking for.

DONNA:

Even when we do our events, we make sure that you can look at who our presenters are. We have the photos, the bios. You can go in and read up on our presenters. You have an outline of what is going to be discussed. We really put thought into how we want to hold our audience, and captivate our audience, and engage our audience.

BRANDON:

It's really, really thrilling to just hear about the different ways that you're thinking about virtual right now and using different events. I know there are a ton of other virtual events that we didn't even really get around to speaking about at all. I know that there are a lot of legislative events that you've produced with some big-name politicians, including Kamala Harris.

DONNA:

Yeah, we did that. Now, that was really our first event out of the gate. Our Legislative Policy Conference usually takes place in Washington, D.C. every year. This particular conference engages a lot of the politician on the Hill so we usually go to the Hill, and we meet with these representatives, and we have our affiliates' CEO and my president and CEO have conversation around legislation, what it is that our community really needs, and what they're looking for. Unfortunately, we were not able to, of course, because of COVID to do that. So what we did was we reached out, they reached out.

DONNA:

We have a Washington Bureau, which is our legislative arm of the National Urban League. They reached out to some of the politicians, the senators like Senator Kamala Harris, Senator Cory Booker, I mean, Senator Chuck Schumer, anyone that was in Senate or Congress at the time, and we told them the subject, what we were discussing, and they did a tape recording for us as well. We put it inside of a whole show. We had our corporate sponsors who had programs that were targeted towards the underserved community. So we also placed them inside of the program. So it was just really a great way. I was very surprised at the turnout. We did 14 events within the virtual space but that particular one event, one conference with 14 different segments to it.

DONNA:

So it was a lot of work, but it turned out very powerful. I mean, the discussions were very meaningful and impactful. We were happy with the end result of that conference, and we got more people to watch the conference than we would ever have gotten to actually come to the event because it's usually a closed event for our affiliates' CEOs, and our constituents, and our partners. But this year, we were able to reach 80,000 people virtually.

BRANDON:

Wow.

DONNA:

Yeah.

BRANDON:

That's huge.

DONNA:

Yeah.

BRANDON:

No, that's amazing. It sounds like that probably gave you a lot of great building blocks to keep in mind as you went into the 2020 broadcast.

DONNA:

Absolutely.

BRANDON:

Cool. Well, for the final few minutes here, I'd love to ask a few more questions just about your general perspectives on events, and leadership, and management. The first one is who's someone you look up to in events marketing or business in general?

DONNA:

I look up to my former bosses, Renee Warren and Kirsten Poe Hill, as well as my current boss, Rhonda Spears Bell. These are women who are really knowledgeable in their field and they're really grounded, but they also provide support and information whenever I need and help wherever I need it. So they've really been able to ingrain in me all the tools that I need to do my job as an event person.

BRANDON:

If you could give an earlier version of yourself one piece of advice, what would it be and why?

DONNA:

I think that it's going to be okay. I think I was really hard on myself. I was really a stickler for everything just being perfect. I realize in event planning, there's no such thing. Things happen, and you just have to learn how to shift. You have to learn how to have your plan B, C, D, E, F, and G in place just in case. So it really taught me patience as well that you have to be patient with your vendors, with your clients, with yourself just in terms of getting things done.

BRANDON:

That's huge, just knowing everything's not going to always work out as planned.

DONNA:

Correct.

BRANDON:

All right. Final question is how can our listeners keep up with National Urban League and all of the great work that you're doing?

DONNA:

The National Urban League is on all social media platform. And for a website, it's nul.org. And for Facebook and Instagram, it's the National Urban League. We are very much active on Instagram and Facebook.

BRANDON:

Folks can check out some of the IG TVs, the broadcast that we were talking about on the show there?

DONNA:

Yeah. They can absolutely go to our website at nul.org, and they can see all of the amazing stuff that we've been working on and hopefully, impactful and informational.